FAQs for the Women’s Monument Dedication Ceremony

FAQs for the Women’s Monument Dedication Ceremony

October 14, 2019, 11 AM – 12:30 PM

Is this event open to the public?
Yes, this event is open to the public. No RSVP or invitation is required to attend.

What time does the event start?
The event starts at 11:00 AM and will end at approximately 12:30 PM.

Will there be parking available?
• 9th and Franklin Parking Deck-Guests can park at the 9th and Franklin parking deck located at 801 E. Franklin Street. Vehicles may enter the parking deck from either 9th Street or Franklin Street.
• 7th and Franklin Parking Deck
• There will be free street parking for Columbus Day; you can use the Parkopedia.com website to locate parking options.
• The Pulse:
When taking the Pulse, exit 9th and Broad Streets at the Government Center Station. Make your way on foot to 9th and Grace Streets, a short walk from the station.
• GRTC Bus Stop:
When taking the GRTC Bus, exit Franklin and 9th Streets. Make your way on foot to 9th and Grace Streets, a short walk from the GRTC Bus Stop.

Will the event have seating?
Yes. There will be limited seating so we suggest arriving early to ensure a seat. There’s additional room in the back for standing.

I have special needs and will need additional assistance. Will there be someone to help me?
There will be a shuttle pick-up at the 9th & Franklin deck and drop-off at 9th & Grace Street for anyone who needs additional assistance with transportation to the event. There will also be staff available to direct you to the appropriate section during the event.

My group is coming in a bus. Where should we get dropped off?
Buses are allowed to drive through the loop at 9th & Grace Street for drop off. Parking is available for them as well. Please email Lindley Griffin at lgriffin@senate.virginia.gov for parking details.

Can I watch from home?
Yes. This event will be live streamed. Use the link below:
http://virginia-senate.granicus.com/ViewPublisher.php?view_id=3

Will the event be rescheduled if it rains?
No. This event is rain or shine.

Shop

Shop

The Virginia Shop at the Capitol (804)698-7661 is open to the public in the extension.

Gift store hours:
Monday – Saturday, 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Sunday, 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
(804)698-7661

The 2018 Annual Capitol Square Ornament is Available!

Seventh in a series of collectible ornaments, the 2018 Official Capitol Square Ornament celebrates The 400th Anniversary of the Capitol Police, a beloved institution on Capitol Square.
Seventh in a series of collectible ornaments, the 2018 Official Capitol Square Ornament celebrates The 400th Anniversary of the Capitol Police, a beloved institution on Capitol Square.

ORDER 2018 ORNAMENT ONLINE.

The Division of Capitol Police has the distinct honor and privilege of being recognized as the first organized policing agency in the nation and will celebrate its 400th anniversary in 2018. Our historical roots originate at the first permanent English settlement in Jamestown, Virginia. In 1618, the Guard, consisting of 10 men was formed to protect the Governor from the hostile Indian population. By 1663, the force was expanded to a force of 20 men and assigned to protect the Governor, the Council, and the Colonial Assembly. The capital was moved to Williamsburg, Virginia in 1699 where the Guard remained an important part of the executive and legislative process. In 1780, the capital of Virginia was again relocated to a safer location, its present home in Richmond. The term “Capitol Police” was first used in an act of the Virginia General Assembly passed on January on January 28, 1884. This act provided “for the appointment of Capitol Police certain other employees about the Public Buildings and Grounds.” The Capitol Police have steadily expanded in size and remain in service to this day.

The Virginia State Garrison Regiment, 1778-1780
The Virginia State Garrison Regiment, 1778-1780 – Learn more about the importance of Virginia Capitol Police with an interactive timeline on their website.

Ornaments are available at The Virginia Shop at the Capitol and in the Capitol at the Lower Rotunda reception desk. Ornaments are also available at the Bell Tower by appointment only please call ahead by contacting Andrea Siebentritt, Communications & Development Coordinator at (804) 786-1010.

New this year: lower shipping rates!

Download the Ornament Order form (past years’ ornaments options are available).

Order the 2018 ornament online at Virginia Capitol Foundation’s
Secure giving site..

If you have any questions or concerns regarding ornament orders or other donation opporunities, please contact us.

A Historic Commonwealth Collection

The official Capitol Square ornaments are a series of annual collectible ornaments, featuring the historic treasures of Capitol Square. Finished in brilliant 24K gold, made entirely in the U.S.A, and presented in a handsome gift box, the ornaments are a perfect gift for colleagues and friends. All proceeds support the Virginia Capitol Foundation’s mission to enhance the educational and cultural potential of Capitol Square’s historic treasures through program development and community engagement.

The First Annual Ornament, introduced in 2012, features the Jefferson-designed Capitol. The Second Annual Virginia Capitol Ornament, introduced in 2013, features the historic Bell Tower. The Third Annual Ornament introduced in 2014, features a true historic Executive Mansion. The fourth Annual Ornament introduced in 2015, features the George Washington Equestrian Monument. The fifth in the series of ornaments for 2016 was a commemorative tribute to Thomas Jefferson, “Architect of Liberty”. The sixth annual ornament for 2017 featured “The Fountain at Monument Walk” representing the fountain location at the base of Monument Walk. The Fountain has adorned Capitol Square since 1852. For 2018, we are excited to release the seventh in this ornament series celebrating The 400th Anniversary of the Capitol Police, a beloved institution on Capitol Square. Please see all ordering options above.

See all prior years’ ornaments available for purchase.

Directions to the Capitol

Directions to the Capitol

Directions to the Capitol

View a larger Google Map for directions.

Directions for tours by bus

Important changes to Bank St. traffic patterns will include:

  • A new “pedestrian plaza” extending from the Commonwealth (formerly Commonwealth Park Suites Hotel) to north 10th Street along Bank Street, between the Pocahontas Building and the Capitol extension public entrance. The plaza will serve as a safe space for members of the public, administration, legislators, state employees, teen pages and the media to move between the two buildings.
  • For school groups and other tour groups to unload visitors from buses. See a map of Capitol Square Auxiliary Bus Parking facility. The auxiliary parking is located at 2400 W. Leigh St. Richmond, VA 23220.
  • Bank Street will become one-way, from west to east, between 10th and 12th streets. Two-way traffic along Bank St. will resume east of 12th Street.
  • Traffic calming measures to prevent speeding will be placed on the north and south sides of Bank Street.
  • There will be no access to Bank St. from Franklin Street.
  • Right turns from 9th Street onto Bank Street will be prohibited for all but hotel traffic, buses for Capitol tours by appointment, and deliveries to the Pocahontas Building.
  • Capitol Police will control access to the pedestrian plaza through automatic gates.

These measures will remain in place while the General Assembly occupies the Pocahontas Building.

Buses that drop off school and other groups at the Capitol extension on Bank Street to visit the Capitol can unload inside the pedestrian plaza, then park at the Department of General Services Office of Fleet Management Services at 2400 W. Leigh St. Richmond, VA 23220.

Unless directed otherwise, buses will return to pick up their passengers along the traffic circle around the equestrian Washington monument located inside the Capitol Square gate at 9th and grace streets, one block uphill from (north of) the pedestrian plaza. Group leaders will need to have direct phone or text communication with their drivers, since buses will not be able to park on or next to Capitol Square.

Traveling I-95 North

By Bus: If traveling north on I-95 take exit 74C (Broad Street). At the fork in the exit ramp bear right (follow “Broad St. East” sign) and enter onto 17th Street heading south. At light turn right onto Broad Street and drive uphill (west) to the light at 14th Street. Turn left at 14th Street and go downhill (south) to the light at Main Street. Turn right onto Main Street and head west to the light at 9th Street. Turn right onto 9th Street and head uphill one block to the first light, at the intersection with Bank Street. Turn right onto Bank Street and stop at the entrance gate to the pedestrian plaza, staffed by the Division of Capitol Police.

Traveling I-95 South

By Bus: If traveling south on I-95 take exit 74B (Franklin Street). Be careful to slow down when taking this exit because it is a short downhill ramp ending at a traffic light. At the light turn right onto Franklin Street and proceed straight ahead to the light at the intersection with 14th Street. Turn left onto 14th Street and go downhill (south) to the light at Main Street. Turn right onto Main Street and head west to the light at 9th Street. Turn right onto 9th Street and head uphill one block to the first light, at the intersection with Bank Street. Turn right onto Bank Street and stop at the entrance gate to the pedestrian plaza, staffed by the Division of Capitol Police.

Traveling I-64 West

By Bus: If traveling west on I-64 get into the left lane while crossing a bridge into downtown Richmond and take the left ramp, exit 190, onto I-95 south. After a short distance take exit 74B (Franklin Street). Be careful to slow down when taking this exit because it is a short downhill ramp ending at a traffic light. At the light turn right onto Franklin Street and proceed straight ahead to the light at the intersection with 14th Street. Turn left onto 14th Street and go downhill (south) to the light at Main Street. Turn right onto Main Street and head west to the light at 9th Street. Turn right onto 9th Street and head uphill one block to the first light, at the intersection with Bank Street. Turn right onto Bank Street and stop at the entrance gate to the pedestrian plaza, staffed by the Division of Capitol Police.

Traveling I-64 East

By Bus: If traveling east on I-64 into downtown Richmond proceed straight ahead on 95 south (AVOID the right exit for I-64 East to Williamsburg) and take exit 74B (Franklin Street). Be careful to slow down when taking this exit because it is a short downhill ramp ending at a traffic light. At the light turn right onto Franklin Street and proceed straight ahead to the light at the intersection with 14th Street. Turn left onto 14th Street and go downhill (south) to the light at Main Street. Turn right onto Main Street and head west to the light at 9th Street. Turn right onto 9th Street and head uphill one block to the first light, at the intersection with Bank Street. Turn right onto Bank Street and stop at the entrance gate to the pedestrian plaza, staffed by the Division of Capitol Police.

Traveling I-195 East (Downtown Expressway)

By Bus: take the 7th/9th street (Rt. 60) exit and stay in the right lane of the exit ramp. Turn left onto 9th Street and proceed north through the intersection with Main Street and uphill one block to the light at the intersection with Bank Street. Turn right onto Bank Street and stop at the entrance gate to the pedestrian plaza, staffed by the Division of Capitol Police.

Hours

Hours

The Capitol building is open to visitors from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Saturday, and from 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Sundays. Self-Guided tours are available during operating hours each day our Capitol Visitors Brochure will help you get started.

Free one-hour guided tours Monday through Saturday are available beginning by 10:00 a.m. for walk-in visitors (or 9:00 a.m. for groups by appointment) and continue throughout the day, with the last tour offered at 4:00 p.m. On Sunday, guided tours are available beginning at 1:00 p.m., with the last tour offered at 4:00 p.m.

In addition, self-guided tours are available during operating hours each day.

The Capitol Building is closed Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s Day.

The Great Charter and the General Assembly: Founding a Legacy in 1619

The Great Charter and the General Assembly: Founding a Legacy in 1619

quote: "...Government intended for the benefit of the people and the strength of the Colony" - Instructions to Governor Yeardley, 1618

Currently on view in the Capitol Visitor Center through December 2019, “The Great Charter and the General Assembly: Founding a Legacy in 1619” is an exhibition that commemorates the 400th anniversary of the Virginia General Assembly. In 1619 the Virginia Company of London sent a set of instructions to the Virginia Colony’s newly appointed governor, Sir George Yeardley (1587-1627).

The Great Charter and the General Assembly Exhibit Now in the Capitol Extension
The Great Charter and the General Assembly Exhibit Now in the Capitol Extension

These instructions came to be known as the “Great Charter” and resulted in sweeping reforms in the management of the colony. Among the most significant was the establishment of an elected assembly. This assembly first met at Jamestown, Virginia in the summer of 1619. This pivotal event in American history marks the founding of what is today the Virginia General Assembly, the oldest representative legislative assembly in the New World. Virginia’s General Assembly has been meeting annually ever since that first historic gathering 400 years ago. Virginia’s 400 year tradition of representative government and the institution of elections stand as lasting legacies and the foundation on which American government and democracy have been built.

400th Anniversary of Capitol Police exhibit now on display in the Capitol

400th Anniversary of Capitol Police exhibit now on display in the Capitol

Dorothy P. Seawell, widow of former Capitol Police Chief William Seawell, spoke with Col. Anthony S. Pike, the current chief, at the opening of the new exhibit commemorating the 400th anniversary of the police force.

An exhibit celebrating the 400-year history of the Virginia Division of Capitol Police opened at the Capitol on Aug. 27.

Curated by the Library of Virginia and displayed in the large hall just behind the gift shop inside the Virginia Capitol’s entrance at 10th and Bank streets, the exhibit is to remain until the opening of the 2019 General Assembly session in January.

The exhibit incorporates research undertaken in recent years by academic interns from Virginia Commonwealth University’s History Department, who helped the Capitol Police detail history dating to its formation in 1618 at the first permanent English settlement in Jamestown.

Features from the exhibit include custom uniforms from the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries as well as three authentic uniforms from the 19th and 20th centuries, two of which were the actual uniforms of Capt. William A. Seawell, the Capitol Police chief from 1961-70, and Col. Anthony S. Pike, the current chief.

Exhibit Photo Gallery:

Seawell’s uniform was part of an extensive collection of his papers and other memorabilia that was loaned to the division by his widow, Dorothy P. Seawell, who attended the exhibit’s opening.

Seventh in a series of collectible ornaments, the 2018 Official Capitol Square Ornament celebrates The 400th Anniversary of the Capitol Police, a beloved institution on Capitol Square.
Seventh in a series of collectible ornaments, the 2018 Official Capitol Square Ornament celebrates The 400th Anniversary of the Capitol Police, a beloved institution on Capitol Square.

Capitol Police also were able to partner with the Virginia Capitol Foundation and Capitol Square Preservation Council to create a holiday ornament that represents the agency’s 400th anniversary. The ornament is on display alongside a collection of division badges and patches.

More Anniversary Resources:

Download the full press release for the opening of the exhibit.

Read weekly vignettes about the history of Virginia Capitol Police on their website blog.

Learn more about the importance of Virginia Capitol Police with an interactive timeline on their website.

Emancipation Proclamation and Freedom Monument

As part of its commemoration of the 150th Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation and abolition of slavery in the United States, the Virginia Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Commission will construct the Emancipation Proclamation and Freedom Monument on Brown’s Island.

The monument, will feature a 12-foot bronze statue representing newly freed slaves.
The monument, will feature a 12-foot bronze statue representing newly freed slaves.

The monument, designed by Thomas Jay Warren of Oregon, will feature a 12-foot bronze statue representing newly freed slaves. Dedicated to the contributions of African American Virginians in the centuries-long fight for emancipation and freedom, the monument also will highlight notable African American Virginians who have made significant contributions to the emancipation and freedom of formerly enslaved persons or descendants. The base of the monument will feature the names, images, and brief biographical information about eight African American Virginians whose lives were dedicated to Emancipation and freedom — five individuals from the period before Emancipation through 1865, and five who continued to work for freedom from 1866 to 1970.

More About the Monument’s Commission

The base of the monument will feature the names, images, and brief biographical information about eight African American Virginians whose lives were dedicated to Emancipation and freedom.
Another view of the monument showing those profiled on the base.

Many Virginian individuals were selected to reflect the time period before emancipation in 1865 – present day. For a list of these finalists to be honored, full history on the monument project, and the selection process, please visit the Virginia Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Commission’s Website.

Capitol Square Landscape

Capitol Square Landscape

Capitol Square’s nationally-recognized historic landscape is an essential element of the Capitol experience. The monuments throughout Capitol Square represent specific eras and iconic Virginians associated with them. With the completion of an important restoration of the Capitol and the Executive Mansion in the last decade, restoration of the surrounding park is the next logical step, readying the complex for the 2016 bicentennial celebration of Capitol Square. The plan will rehabilitate one of the oldest enclosed public parks in our nation by reclaiming components of early and mid19th-century landscape designs, including the John Notman picturesque style, which predates New York’s Central Park by more than a decade. The Square’s preservation is fundamental to the Capitol’s integrity as an historic resource.

Capitol Square Map, circa 1876, highlighting the John Notman landscape design
Capitol Square Map, circa 1876, highlighting the John Notman landscape design

The Executive Mansion Kitchen

The Executive Mansion Kitchen

The cottage outside of the Governor's Mansion where the restored kitchen is located
The cottage outside of the Governor’s Mansion where the restored kitchen is located
Virginia’s Executive Mansion is the oldest governor’s residence in the United States which continues to serve its original purpose. Every day, the mansion welcomes groups, ranging from school children to international dignitaries, who explore its historic spaces. The kitchen dependency, constructed in 1813 and adjacent to the Mansion, will be restored and interpreted to tell the stories of the individuals, including enslaved persons, who served Governors and their families in the 19th-century.

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